Monday, May 31, 2010

A Dachshund Memorial Day, 2010

"Mousy," a four-month-old Dachshund puppy, is readied for his low level mission by his master, Staff Sergeant Robert E. Brumley, 25th Aerospace Defense Squadron (ADS).  "Mousy" was not too eager for the task at first, but he quickly settled down to save some Vandenberg Air Force Base missilemen and the taxpayers some money.


In honor of Memorial Day, 2010, we bring you this patriotic Dachshund tale.

A PUP NAMED "MOUSY," MISSILES, AND MONEY
by Capt. Thomas D. Boettcher, USAF
Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

Air Force cost reduction monitors at this massive missile installation may give "Mousy," a four-month-old Dachshund, a special achievement award.
The 25th Aerospace Defense Squadron (ADS) had a problem.  One of the unit's jobs is to guide missiles launched from the aerospace complex, and one of their guidance antennas needed a cleaning job.  Hydraulic fluid had coated the tall tower, and it had to come off.
The solution was simple enough, Wash it.  However, the water hose had to be stretched across an active road.  The cleaning was more than a one day task, and since the road could not be closed, the hose would get smashed by heavy trucks.
About that time Mousy strolled by.  His master, Staff Sergeant Robert E. Brumley of the 25th ADS, requested the Dachshund's assistance, so he volunteered.  Being a rather young airman of sorts, Mousy had not yet learned the old soldier's warning, "Don't volunteer for anything."
The next few minutes brought him meaning for that admonition.  As SSgt. Brumley gingerly tied a small string loosely around the pup's neck, Mousy's look reflected his second thoughts.
Nor did he feel any better when the sergeant lifted him down into a tunnel.  "I'm too young for this kind of duty," he must have thought, and his pleading eyes vividly expressed such anxious sentiments.
He quickly relaxed, though, as any good airman would, as soon as he got a better understanding of his mission.
According to the briefing SSgt. Brumley gave him, he was to make a low pass through an 80-foot cable trough that tunneled under the road.  He was to make certain, of course, that he didn't lose the loosely fitting string.
Mousy took the problem in stride.  His low profile was more than a match for the confining task.  With a little encouragement he made his way quickly to the other end of the tunnel, his light but long load trailing behind.
There his master, SSgt. Brumley, was waiting for him.  After untying the string, the Air Force non-commissioned officer lifted the hero into the air to the cheers of the several fellows watching.
It was a great day for Mousy.  He had safely and swiftly piloted his cargo through the dark tunnel.  His was masterful navigation at its best.
Relishing his success, he sat quietly as the airmen then attached the string to a rubber hose.  They then began pulling the string and the attached hose through the tunnel.  Minutes later the hose emerged from the other end.
The water was then turned on, and the airmen began washing down the tower.  The water steadily flowed through the hose safely encased in the tunnel as the trucks roared overhead.
Mousy had saved the $22 hose.  It was a good day for U.S. taxpayers and the four-month-old Dachshund.

via The American Dachshund Magazine, January, 1971.

Woof, WOOF! Don't miss some amazing stories of Dachshunds and the military from the archives:

Dachshund Homecoming

Happy Memorial Day

Veterans Day and Dachshunds

Dachshunds in Pop Culture: Fritz and the "Jane" Cartoon Series

Dachshunds in History: The Saga of Sgt. Wally D. Hund

Dachshunds Reunited with their Dads in the News

Dachshunds and Veterans Day

Dachshunds Teleconferencing with their Dads in Iraq in the News

Dachshunds in History: Mimi, A Most Unpopular Dog During WW2

Memorial Day Dachshund: Meet Gus

Dachshund News Roundup! - story on Vietnam War Veteran Jim Quick and his dachshund

Dachshund News Roundup! - story on Iraq War Veteran Scott MacKenzie and his new rescue boy

Dachshunds in History: Hark! Hark! The Dogs Do Bark!

Dachshunds in History: Dogs of War

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

What a great story! Even more so because I go to Vandenberg every few months for work!

Cynthia said...

"Mousy" looks like a female to me.....

Joey and Maggie said...

We were thinking the same thing Cynthia!

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